Speculative Diction: Future Tense [March 24 2011]

This post addresses how students are often preoccupied with the future because they’re insecure in the present (particularly financially, but in other ways too). No-one can really blame them from wanting to know where university will take them, since after all, they were told they had to go to university in order to get work later. If you don’t know much else about it, it’s hard to comprehend what else education might be for. Ironically, this means it can be harder to tap into the desire that’s needed in order to excel at university learning.

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University of Venus: Communication, Not Edutainment [March 3, 2011]

I wrote one of my University of Venus posts in response to the idea that undergraduate students seem to be easily bored by many different topics. rather than banning them from engaging with “distracting” technologies in class, perhaps we could try to connect with them more and figure out where the roots of that boredom are buried.

Speculative Diction: Go on, Have a Laugh [December 10, 2010]

I don’t find I have many role models when it comes to giving a good lecture, or teaching in general. But I take inspiration where I can get it, and this post is about how I often think of favourite stand-up comedians when I’m trying to summon the confidence to speak in public (or to a class). I think humour can play a helpful role in teaching and learning.

Since the Bill Bailey link in the original post no longer works, I’ll include an excerpt from it here instead:

Speculative Diction: Writing It Out [October 4 2010]

Writer’s block may not be the most interesting topic, but it’s something most of us have dealt with at one time or another. How much formal and informal help with writing do graduate students find available, and how do they learn the process of writing as opposed to merely mimicking a particular (desired) outcome? In this post I looked at my own experiences with (lack of) writing assistance and how helping others to write can help bring one’s own process to light.