Journal Commentary: The role of communication in governance – Universities and (new) media [July 31 2013]

I’ve had a short essay published in the Journal of Professional Communication. The essay is about the role of communication in organizational governance, and takes the university as an example of how new media are affecting organizations’ public relations practices and the kind of work that must be done by/through communication.

The journal home page is here, and my essay is in Volume 2, Issue 2.

The link to a PDF of my piece is here.

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Speculative Diction: MOOCs, access, & privileged assumptions [June 19 2013]

In this blog post I compare the rhetoric of accessibility that occurs in arguments for MOOCs, to the kinds of examples chosen to represent this – in the context of an existing literature on higher education accessibility.

Shortly after this was published, I attended Worldviews 2013 and was a member of a panel that discussed “Who are the MOOC users?” On the panel I made a number of the same points that you’ll find in this blog post. I wrote a follow-up post available here.

Speculative Diction: Risk, responsibility, and public academics [July 3 2013]

This blog post addresses the way that early-career academics feel encouraged to engage in public or interactive communication, yet find that the professional assessment of these activities is still fairly low – and that the professional “risk” isn’t the same for everyone.

On July 18 2013, this piece was re-posted on the LSE Impact Blog titled “More attention should be paid to the risks facing early career researchers in encouraging wider engagement”.

Speculative Diction: Cracking the code for employment [January 13, 2012]

I wrote this post after reading one too many articles about how coding is the skill that leads to a job. It’s a skill all right, and a useful one, but will it definitely lead to a job? We come back again to the “purpose” of learning, or of education – and because of context so many people are fixated on the magic formula for employment, that other factors are diminished. Not only that, but we lose sight of the process by which people actually do end up with meaningful employment.